Resources

 

  • Higher Education Digital Video Summit Executive Summary: A Digital Video Summit was held at the Canadian Consulate General in New York City on March 26, 2010. The goal was to bring together buyers, distributors, and filmmakers to develop an agreement on best practices for streaming video. The dialogue will continue at the 38th National Media Market in Baltimore, MD in October 2016.

 

  • Digital rights available from National Media Market exhibitors, in PDF (35 KB) and Microsoft Excel (29 KB).
     

Copyright Resources

  • http://librarycopyright.net/resources/genie/
  • http://librarycopyright.net/resources/
     
  • Video At Risk Project

    What happens to circulating VHS collections when they die? For Research Library collections across the continent, physical degradation of the media housing valuable, unique, and out–of–print video material looms immanent. Across the board, there is a pressing need to reframe principles and practices in situations where risk is defined by scarcity, and reformatting by legal and practical processes is not yet illuminated by common or best practices. This Mellon Foundation–funded collaborative study brings together New York University's Division of Libraries with the Moving Image Archiving & Preservation program at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts, and the circulating media collections of the University of California Berkeley and Loyola University (New Orleans) to collaboratively address these challenges.

  • Best Practices for Fair Use

A number of professional organizations and associations have developed statements of best practices for fair use. These codes and principles reduce risk of copyright infringement by clarifying professional community standards. These can be especially helpful when you have a specific fair use situation related to teaching, research, or publication. Some examples: A student might wonder if she could include an image of a work by a contemporary artist in her master's thesis. A poet may be concerned about making allusions to the work of other poets, to advertising copy, or to content from journalism or pop culture. A budding journalist captures a scene from everyday life in a video report, but copyrighted music playing in the background of the scene was also recorded. The statements listed below outline many such scenarios, then discuss how the principles of fair use might apply; they also discuss limitations that would tend to negate a fair use argument.

Professor Peter Jaszi explains the codes: "The flexibility of fair use can lead users to wish for clearer rules or brighter lines. But the flexibility of fair use is its strength. Courts have emphasized that fair use analysis is fact- and situation-specific. In most cases, however, it is also quite predictable. Moreover, it can be made more so. Even without case law specifically addressing a use, judges and lawyers consider expectations and practice—whether the user acted reasonably and in good faith in light of standards of accepted practice in a particular field. One way of creating better understanding of what fair use permits is, therefore, to document the considered attitudes and best practices of a professional community." ("Fair Use Today," Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts, College Art Association, 2015, p. 14).

 

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts from the College Art Association

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries from the Association of Research Libraries

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education from the Center for Media and Social Impact, American University

Documentary Filmmakers' Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use from the Center for Media and Social Impact, American University

Code of Best Practices for Fair Use in Poetry from the Center for Media and Social Impact, American University

Code of Best Practices for Fair Use in Online Video from the Center for Media and Social Impact, American University

Set of Principles in Fair Use for Journalism from the Center for Media and Social Impact, American University

Statement on the Fair Use of Images for Teaching, Research, and Study from the Visual Resources Association

Statement of Fair Use Best Practices for Media Studies Publishing from the Society for Cinema and Media Studies

Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use in Teaching for Film and Media Educators from the Society for Cinema and Media Studies

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Scholarly Research in Communication from the International Communication Association

Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use of Dance-related Materials from the Dance Heritage Coalition

  • Streaming Video Libguide Examples:

http://libguides.library.cofc.edu/videostreaming/streamingvideoataddlestone

http://libguides.asu.edu/StreamingVideo

http://libguides.utk.edu/streaming

http://libguides.wmich.edu/video

http://libguides.tcu.edu/video

http://libguides.hofstra.edu/video

  • The Described and Captioned Media Program’s (DCMP) video “Listening is Learning” shows how having access to media with description is critical for students who are blind or visually impaired. While it was developed for visually impaired audiences, description has much broader appeal and use. This video describes the value to most learners of viewing video with captions and description.

 

  • Michelle Flamos' "The Apps Jungle" PowerPoint presentation from her 2013 NMM professional development session. (7.9 MB PowerPoint file)
     
  • Brian Boling's "ADA Compliance for Locally Hosted Streaming Videos" PowerPoint presentation from his 2013 NMM professional development session. (3.9 MB PowerPoint file)
  • Wendy Collins, Gina Krause & Matthew Haun’s PowerPoint slides from their professional development session Digital Media 101: Deciphering the Bits and Bytes of Online Video: Digital_Video_101.pptx (2.6 MB PowerPoint file).
  • Allen Chou’s PowerPoint slides from his professional development session How to Build an Audience and Media Collection using Social Media Marketing: Social_Media_Marketing.ppt (12.8 MB PowerPoint file)